7 Books about Oskar Schindler

01. Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activites, and the True Story Behind the List

Spy, businessman, bon vivant, Nazi Party member, Righteous Gentile.

This was Oskar Schindler, the controversial savior of almost 12,000 Jews during the Holocaust who struggled afterwards to rebuild his life and gain international recognition for his wartime deeds.

Author David Crowe examines every phase of his life in this landmark biography, presenting a figure of mythic proportions that one prominent Schindler Jew described as an extraordinary man in extraordinary times.

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02. Schindler’s List

The acclaimed bestselling classic of Holocaust literature, winner of the Booker Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Fiction, and the inspiration for the classic film.

In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler’s Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil.

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03. Oskar Schindler and His List

Over thirty years before Thomas Keneally wrote the book “Schindler’s List,” journalist Herbert Steinhouse interviewed Oskar Schindler.

That 1949 interview, and Steinhouse’s subsequent magazine article, plus an extensive interview with Steinhouse, opens this collection of essays, articles and interviews, which illuminate Schindler and the international effect of his story.

Of the writings about Oskar Schindler, this is the only book to incorporate Schindler’s life, Keneally’s book, and the Academy-Award winning film inspired by Schindler’s heroism.

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04. Oskar Schindler’s Jews: The 1,098 Jews saved by Schindler

A brief but thorough biography of Oskar Schindler in which we discover a very different person than we got used film director Steven Spielberg; one Oskar spy, alcoholic and womanizer but kind to his Jews.

Schindler lists translated into English with detail list number, list number, religion, nationality, prisoner number, name, surname, date of birth and occupation in the factory every 1,098 Jews are included List and the subsequent fate of some of them. Included in this book is the 19 pages of the original lists.

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05. Schindler’s Legacy: True Stories of the List Survivors

They appeared at the end of the movie Schindler’s List – the poignant processional of real-life people whom Oskar Schindler saved. Now they tell their stories in a book that is the living legacy of what Schindler did and what the human spirit can endure and overcome. Through their own words and more than 100 personal photographs, we learn the truth of their experiences with Schindler, their incredible stories of day-to-day survival, and their ultimate triumph of rebuilding lives, reclaiming family, and recording their memories for future generations.

What they have in common is this: Oskar Schindler gave each a second chance at life. Now we learn what they did with that precious gift.

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06. Oskar Schindler Saved My Life

Carl Freedman is a man who knows the importance of each day and the value of appreciating what one has and who it comes from. This book is a must read for those looking to learn about the incredible things Schindler did for not just Mr. Freedman, but hundreds of Jews during the War. Mr. Freedman’s positivity and love of life is humbly expressed through his gratitude towards those around him and the narrative of his experiences.

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07. The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler’s List

A remarkable memoir from Leon Leyson, one of the youngest children to survive the Holocaust on Oskar Schindler’s list.

This, the only memoir published by a former Schindler’s list child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. Leon Leyson was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. With incredible luck, perseverance, and grit, Leyson was able to survive the sadism of the Nazis, including that of the demonic Amon Goeth, commandant of Plaszow, the concentration camp outside Krakow.

Told with an abundance of dignity and a remarkable lack of rancor and venom, The Boy on the Wooden Box is a legacy of hope, a memoir unlike anything you’ve ever read.

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